Obituaries

Marcus Alexander Sleightholm

BMJ 2009; 338 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.b144 (Published 20 January 2009) Cite this as: BMJ 2009;338:b144
  1. Rhys Davies,
  2. Mike Smith

    Rhys Davies writes:

    Marcus Alexander Sleightholm was a singular soul who was unlike anyone we are likely to meet again.

    After qualifying and house jobs at the Royal Liverpool Hospital he worked at the Hammersmith Hospital in London and Addenbrooke’s in Cambridge before moving to Leeds.

    He had many interests outside medicine, in particular amateur radio and sailing. He was an accomplished photographer (much of his work has been published, and he recorded our medical student days!), and he was a splendid jazz guitarist, which was his greatest love.

    Marcus lived alone but leaves his father and two sisters (his mother and brother predeceased him). He also leaves many friends.

    Mike Smith writes a eulogy for Marcus:

    Introduction

    Marcus was a singular soul who was unlike anyone we are ever likely to meet again.

    I’ve only really known Marcus well for about 12 years, but in that time he has become a close friend. He was a complex and multifaceted man, and before I try to convey a glimpse into the different aspects of Marcus’s rich life, I’d like to read some of the tributes from friends, which poured in by phone, text, and email:

    “Apart from being very clever he was also really kind. which I find a very unusual combination.”

    “He was a delightful quirky man, whose company we always found stimulating.”

    “He had a very dry sense of humour—a bit too dry for me at times, but that was Marcus.”

    “There was a deep underlying spirit of generosity and fair play.”

    “Perfect gentleman. Loyal friend. Never heard him swear or be nasty, cruel, or unkind.”

    “Mind you he can be a grumpy bugger at times.”

    “He always acted honourably and expected others to do the same.”

    “He made a great impression on others in his life and …

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