Letters Allergies hysteria is just nuts

Some auto-injection pens are counterintuitive

BMJ 2009; 338 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.b1303 (Published 31 March 2009) Cite this as: BMJ 2009;338:b1303
  1. Per Lav Madsen1,
  2. Nick Mattsson2
  1. 1Department of Cardiology, Rigshospitalet 2142, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark
  2. 2Department of Internal Medicine, Nykøbing Falster Community Hospital, Denmark
  1. per.lav.madsen{at}rh.dk

    Type I allergy carries the risk of incorrect self treatment.1 In patients with type I allergy and established systemic reactions, treatment includes self injection of adrenaline with prefilled devices—the EpiPen device is constructed to look like a ballpoint pen. Unfortunately it is constructed as an upside-down pen: the needle emerges from …

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