Minerva

Minerva

BMJ 2008; 336 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.39471.440694.47 (Published 31 January 2008) Cite this as: BMJ 2008;336:284

Here’s a tip to make nasogastric tube insertion easier—fill the tube with water first. Use distilled water at room temperature, and fill the tube by placing the distal end with its side holes immersed, then suck water into the proximal end with a feeding syringe and tap it to keep the water in the tube. As water is denser than air, filling the tube with water increases its rigidity, making it easier to introduce. It’s best if the intubated patient is paralysed, to avoid choking if the water leaks out (Emergency Medical Journal 2008;25:23-5; doi: 10.1136/emj.2007.049312).

General practitioners are being targeted by a company that has set up a scheme for collecting used batteries. It believes that GP surgeries produce large volumes of dead batteries and is keen to get them to buy a “BattBox” which sits on a shelf and, once full, will be collected and the batteries carefully sorted and safely recycled. The box itself will eventually …

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