Views & Reviews Between the lines

Miscellaneous truths

BMJ 2007; 335 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.39351.627199.59 (Published 18 October 2007) Cite this as: BMJ 2007;335:829
  1. Theodore Dalrymple, writer and retired doctor

    The Harleian Miscellany is a selection of early pamphlets from the library of the Earl of Oxford, catalogued by Samuel Johnson, and first published in 1744. Whoever opens one of its 10 volumes is almost certain to be detained for hours, for who can resist titles such as “A short, legal, useful, safe, and easy Prescription to recover our Kingdom, Church and Nation, from their present dangerous, distractive, destructive Confusion, and worse than Bedlam Madness,” a title to ensure perennial contemporary relevance, though published in 1659?

    Or again, “The She-Wedding: or, a Mad Marriage, between Mary, a Seaman's Mistress, and Margaret, a Carpenter's Wife, at Deptford, being a full Relation of a cunning Intrigue, carried on and managed by …

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