Views & Reviews Review of the week

Reader, I didn't blush

BMJ 2007; 335 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.39370.480856.59 (Published 18 October 2007) Cite this as: BMJ 2007;335:827
  1. Colin Martin, independent consultant in healthcare communication, London
  1. Cmpubrel{at}aol.com

    An exhibition focusing on representations of the sex act down the ages shows that the way sex is depicted is as unchanging as sex itself, Colin Martin finds

    Spanning 2000 years of art from around the world, Seduced: Art and Sex from Antiquity to Now is the first exhibition to deal specifically with explicit representations of sexual intercourse. Although earlier exhibitions have covered other aspects of sex, its curators believe that it is the first to deal specifically with coitus.

    “We are all here because of a sexual act,” say curators Marina Wallace, Martin Kemp, and Joanne Bernstein. “The union of two bodies is an act of extraordinary physical and emotional immediacy. The prelude, the process of seduction, the act itself, and the immediate aftermath provide the focus for our exhibition.” Their selection of works is panoramic, with no holds …

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