Minerva

Minerva

BMJ 2007; 335 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.39297.426273.BD1 (Published 09 August 2007) Cite this as: BMJ 2007;335:310

Written material about what a research study is investigating and the risks and benefits of involvement is often presented to adults and children alike. Unsurprisingly, when the same material is modified to reflect the age of the reader and the reading and cognitive abilities of children, there's much greater understanding and acceptance. Most children find the modified version to be “friendlier” and “easier to read” (Anesthesia and Analgesia 2007;105:358-64 doi: 10.1213/01.ane.0000270326.44507.11). The use of a larger font and pictures was particularly popular.

Tendon injuries located at osteotendinous junctions are commonly seen in general practice, and anti-inflammatory agents are often recommended. But when the effect of these drugs was tested on the healing strength at the bone-tendon junction in rats, anti-inflammatory agents, with the exception of ibuprofen, had a detrimental effect (American Journal of Sports Medicine 2007;35:1326-33 doi: 10.1177/0363546507301584). Paracetamol had no effect on healing strength. The adverse effect of these agents may be mediated by reducing the collagen content at the injury site.

Gay and bisexual men may get more out of their local …

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