Minerva

Minerva

BMJ 2007; 334 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.39205.607859.BD1 (Published 10 May 2007) Cite this as: BMJ 2007;334:1012

Three women who were desperate to preserve their reproductive capacity—but knew that they were at risk of bleeding and need for hysterectomy when giving birth—took the unusual step of giving birth not in a delivery suite or in an operating theatre but in an interventional radiology suite. All three had caesarean sections after placement of a balloon or embolotherapy in the uterine artery, which successfully minimised blood loss in delivery (Anesthesia and Analgesia 2007;104:1193-4 doi: 10.1213/01.ane.0000260264.89337.9e).

Chronic stress, such as in unemployment, is linked to persistent impairment of natural killer cells, resulting in a reduced immune function. But the good news is that almost normal function resumes once the source of stress is removed. Once unemployed people found new jobs, 44-73% of their immune function was rapidly restored compared with people who were continually employed. Men and women showed the same thing …

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