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It's about sex, but not sexy enough

BMJ 2006; 333 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.39056.416725.59 (Published 07 December 2006) Cite this as: BMJ 2006;333:1227
  1. Richard Ma (richard.ma@btinternet.com)

    I am writing this to coincide with my last day working in a busy community family planning clinic in north London. For those who feel they have a messianic mission to change the world, such as eradicate HIV or malaria in sub-Saharan Africa, they need not look any further. Why not work in an inner city family planning clinic closer to home and help eradicate unplanned pregnancies and chlamydia? I guarantee a working environment that could be compared with a remote village in a low income country: short staffed and poorly paid, with clinic users travelling long distances and queuing for hours. And yet most clients are grateful to be seen and the staff go home feeling pleased, knowing that they have done something for humanity. The pay also makes you feel as if you are working for a charity.

    So why am I leaving? Same reason as everyone else—I feel demoralised …

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