Practice

Theory and practice of making difficult clinical decisions

BMJ 2006; 333 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.38975.473889.68 (Published 28 September 2006) Cite this as: BMJ 2006;333:694
  1. Ed Peile, head of institute1 ([email protected])
  1. 1 Institute of Clinical Education, Warwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL

    The student patient described in this report excited widespread interest in the medical community.1 As well as heartfelt sympathy for the patient and her family over this crisis, respondents have expressed empathy for the clinical team faced with the dilemma of offering best care. Some interesting threads have emerged in the correspondence.2

    Doctors of many disciplines have modelled their thinking processes, and there are some wonderful examples of clinical reasoning. From the start, a majority of readers were highlighting the probability of …

    View Full Text

    Sign in

    Log in through your institution

    Free trial

    Register for a free trial to thebmj.com to receive unlimited access to all content on thebmj.com for 14 days.
    Sign up for a free trial

    Subscribe