Letters

Early intervention in acute renal failure: Evidence of inadequate intravenous fluid treatment in UK hospitals

BMJ 2006; 333 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.333.7567.551-a (Published 07 September 2006) Cite this as: BMJ 2006;333:551
  1. Nicholas J Matheson, senior house officer in medicine (nickmatheson@yahoo.com),
  2. Sarosh R Irani, locum registrar in medicine,
  3. Anushka Irani, clinical fellow in rheumatology
  1. St Thomas' Hospital, London SE1 7EH
  2. John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford OX3 9DU
  3. Great Western Hospital, Swindon SN3 6BB

    EDITOR—Bennett-Jones emphasises the importance of prompt administration of intravenous fluids for early intervention in acute renal failure.1 Determining the appropriate rate of fluid administration must include an estimate of the degree of intravascular volume depletion at the start of treatment, with most aggressive volume expansion targeted at patients with the greatest deficits. To determine whether this simple principle is followed in practice, we audited intravenous fluid prescriptions …

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