Reviews Web

Dr Pod's Healthcast

BMJ 2006; 332 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.332.7553.1340-a (Published 01 June 2006) Cite this as: BMJ 2006;332:1340
  1. Graham Easton ([email protected]), general practitioner and broadcaster
  1. Ealing, London

    Podcasting is all the rage at the moment, and it has the potential to become a faithful friend to the busy doctor. A podcast is really a radio programme, but instead of being broadcast over the airwaves at a set time and then lost in the ether, you can download it on to your computer or your personal iPod to listen to when and where you want.

    There are now podcasts for all sorts of folk from car enthusiasts to sporting gamblers, but doctors more than most have good reason to tap into the new technology. Imagine being able to keep up to date as you drive to work, cycle to your house visits, or slurp a quick coffee in front of your computer. No wonder medical podcasts are springing up left right and centre; for example, the New England Journal of Medicine and the Journal of the American Medical Association already have regular audio …

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