Fillers Advice that shaped my practice

Doctor who?

BMJ 2006; 332 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.332.7541.583 (Published 09 March 2006) Cite this as: BMJ 2006;332:583
  1. Charles Essex, consultant neurodevelopmental paediatrician (room101@ntlworld.com)1
  1. 1 Gulson Hospital, Coventry

    “Wear a badge and introduce yourself,” I was told on my first morning on the wards as a medical student. This was in the 1970s, which, we keep being reminded, were the Dark Ages of doctor-patient communication—unlike today when medical students and young doctors get training in communication skills. The doctor added, “You are going to ask some very personal questions and do some very intimate things. The least you can do is tell the patient who you are.”

    Name badges used to have safety-pin fastenings, which made holes in your clothes or white coat. The modern clip-on badges avoid that. The disadvantage is that they can be clipped to belts or trouser pockets, where they can be read …

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