Editorials

The burden of chronic kidney disease

BMJ 2006; 332 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.332.7541.563 (Published 09 March 2006) Cite this as: BMJ 2006;332:563
  1. Rizwan A Hamer, specialist registrar,
  2. A Meguid El Nahas, professor ([email protected])
  1. Sheffield Kidney Institute, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Northern General Hospital, Sheffield S5 7AU
  2. Sheffield Kidney Institute, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Northern General Hospital, Sheffield S5 7AU

    Is rising rapidly worldwide

    The number of patients with chronic kidney disease worldwide is rising markedly.1 In the United Kingdom, the annual incidence of end stage renal disease is around 100 per 1 000 000 population.2 This incidence has doubled over the past decade and is expected to continue to rise by 5-8% annually, but it remains well below the European average (around 135/1 000 000) and that of the United States (336/1 000 000).3

    Disparities in the incidence of end stage renal disease within and between developed countries reflect racial and ethnic diversity. In the US, the annual incidence is 256/1 000 000 in white people compared with 982/1 000 000 in African-Americans.3 In Australia, the incidence in white people is comparable to that in the UK (94/1 000 000), but the incidence in aboriginals is 420/1 000 000.

    The rise in end stage renal disease worldwide most probably reflects the global epidemic of type 2 diabetes and the ageing of the populations in developed countries, with a higher incidence in elderly people (the annual incidence in people over 65 in the …

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