Reviews Book

Contact Wounds: A War Surgeon's Education

BMJ 2006; 332 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.332.7538.428 (Published 16 February 2006) Cite this as: BMJ 2006;332:428
  1. Richard Villar, consultant orthopaedic surgeon ([email protected])
  1. the Wellington Hospital, London

    Work in any conflict zone and you will run into a diversity of interesting characters. By no standards can medicine in such an environment be regarded as normal. It is uncomfortable, dangerous, unpredictable, and frequently lonely. It is invariably low paid. There is also an almost unwritten rule that no one asks a colleague why he or she has ended up working in such a situation. So often there has been some drama at home—divorce, bereavement, or repossession, scenarios that we all wish to avoid.


    Embedded Image

    Jonathan Kaplan

    Picador, £17.99, pp 278 ISBN 0 330 49258 6

    Rating: GraphicGraphicGraphicGraphic

    I remember an SAS officer once telling me that the SAS was a “bunch of misfits who happened to fit together.” What an apt description that was. Conflict zones seem a perfect escape for such people. So, as I opened the …

    View Full Text

    Sign in

    Log in through your institution

    Free trial

    Register for a free trial to thebmj.com to receive unlimited access to all content on thebmj.com for 14 days.
    Sign up for a free trial

    Subscribe