Letters

Barriers to using warfarin in non-valvular atrial fibrillation

BMJ 2006; 332 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.332.7536.303-b (Published 02 February 2006) Cite this as: BMJ 2006;332:303
  1. Melina Gattellari, research fellow (Melina.Gattellari@sswahs.nsw.gov.au),
  2. Nicholas A Zwar, director,
  3. John M Worthington, senior staff specialist in neurology,
  4. Sandy Middleton, professor of nursing
  1. General Practice Unit, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of New South Wales, Kensington, NSW 2052, Australia
  2. General Practice Unit, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of New South Wales, Kensington, NSW 2052, Australia
  3. Liverpool Health Service. Locked Bag 7017, Liverpool, NSW 1871
  4. School of Nursing (NSW), ACU National, PO Box 968, North Sydney, NSW 2059

    EDITOR—Anticoagulation is underused in the treatment of non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Choudhry et al show that adverse outcomes from anticoagulation have greater influence on its management than occurrences of avoidable ischaemic stroke.1 They speculate that this result arises from undue fear or concern about adverse consequences of anticoagulation.

    We are conducting a representative national survey of 1000 Australian general practitioners, addressing how fear of anticoagulation affects management of non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Our preliminary findings indicate that aversion to the risk of …

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