Letter

New TB vaccine granted orphan drug status

BMJ 2005; 331 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.331.7530.1476 (Published 15 December 2005) Cite this as: BMJ 2005;331:1476
  1. T Lang, project manager, malaria and TB vaccines ([email protected]),
  2. A V S Hill, Wellcome Trust senior principal research scientist,
  3. H McShane, Wellcome Trust senior clinical fellow,
  4. R Shah, pharmaceutical consultant,
  5. A Towse, director,
  6. C Pritchard, health economist,
  7. M Garau, health economist
  1. Centre for Clinical Vaccinology and Tropical Medicine, Churchill Hospital, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7LJ
  2. Centre for Clinical Vaccinology and Tropical Medicine, Churchill Hospital, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7LJ
  3. Gerrards Cross, Buckinghamshire SL9 7JA
  4. Office of Health Economics, London SW1A 2DY

    EDITOR—We report how orphan drug status is also relevant for global diseases most prevalent in developing countries.

    One third of the world's population is chronically infected with tuberculosis (TB), and 500 children die every day.1 The current BCG vaccine protects children against disseminated disease but confers variable protection against lung disease in adults. A recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara expressing the antigen 85A gene from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MVA85A) is being developed to enhance the immunogenicity …

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