Reviews Book

Mad, Bad and Dangerous: The Scientist and the Cinema

BMJ 2005; 331 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.331.7528.1344 (Published 01 December 2005) Cite this as: BMJ 2005;331:1344
  1. Colin Martin, independent consultant in healthcare communication (Cmpubrel@aol.com)
  1. London

    Fictional narratives in literature, film, and television help shape public perception of scientists and doctors, their values, and how they behave; they also promote a shared self identity among professionals. Cultural commentators and medical historians' interest in how clinicians and medical scientists are represented in feature films has developed in parallel with the use of films in teaching, which is now a popular means of stimulating debate on biomedical ethics and professional conduct, in undergraduate medicine and medical history courses.


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    Christopher Frayling

    Reaktion Books, £19.95/$35, pp 240 ISBN 1 86189 255 1

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    Christopher Frayling's book characterises several thematic variations in the portrayal of scientists …

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