Letters

Informed consent

BMJ 2005; 331 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.331.7524.1082-a (Published 03 November 2005) Cite this as: BMJ 2005;331:1082

Is frightening patients really in their best interests?

  1. Christopher P J Wood, senior house officer, orthopaedic surgery (cpjwood@hotmail.com),
  2. Simon C Blackburn, senior house officer, orthopaedic surgery
  1. Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust, Royal Sussex County Hospital, Brighton BN2 5BE
  2. Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust, Royal Sussex County Hospital, Brighton BN2 5BE

    EDITOR—Rowbotham raises some issues in his article that are familiar to us as surgical trainees.1 We are often in the position of obtaining patients' consent for operations which, although clearly in their best interests, entail the discussion of rarely occurring, but serious, risks, leaving the patient worried about rare, but serious, complications.

    Unfortunately, in today's climate of …

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