Editorials

Medical needs of immigrant populations

BMJ 2005; 331 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.331.7514.418 (Published 18 August 2005) Cite this as: BMJ 2005;331:418
  1. Shahid Anis Khan, consultant physician ([email protected]),
  2. Partha Ghosh, consultant physician
  1. Elderly Care and General Medicine, Lister Hospital, Stevenage SG1 4AB
  2. Elderly Care and General Medicine, Lister Hospital, Stevenage SG1 4AB

    Will lead to new challenges for the NHS in future

    The world's population has doubled over the past 50 years.1 The annual growth rate of 1.3% will result in a further increase to around 9 billion by 2050. Nearly a third of this growth is attributed to three countries in South Asia—namely India (21%), Pakistan (5%), and Bangladesh (4%)—which have historic, cultural, and economic ties with the United Kingdom. According to the International Organisation for Migration, the total number of migrants worldwide increased from 84 million in 1975 to 175 million by 2000,2 and by 2050 it may have reached 230 million.

    Meanwhile, the global population of elderly people is increasing. By 2050 the overall growth rate of 2.4% per …

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