Letters

Aid after disasters: Evidence for psychosocial services needs strengthening

BMJ 2005; 331 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.331.7507.50 (Published 30 June 2005) Cite this as: BMJ 2005;331:50
  1. Debarati Guha-Sapir (Sapir@esp.ucl.ac.be), professor,
  2. Wilbert van Panhuis, research fellow,
  3. Joel Lagoutte, medical director
  1. Centre for Research on Epidemiology of Disasters (CRED), Department of Public Health, Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium
  2. Centre for Research on Epidemiology of Disasters (CRED), Department of Public Health, Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium
  3. ICRC Field Hospital, Banda Aceh, Aceh, Indonesia

    EDITOR—The editorial by van Ommeren et al on aid after disasters is right on the mark.1 The psychosocial component in emergency relief action has increased recently. Donors clearly feel morally bound to provide funding for psychosocial relief, although many aid providers are not necessarily qualified for these services, in the process discrediting those who are.

    From an epidemiological perspective, the …

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