Reviews Book

Narrative Research in Health and Illness

BMJ 2005; 330 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.330.7503.1336 (Published 02 June 2005) Cite this as: BMJ 2005;330:1336
  1. Christopher F C Jordens, research academic (cjordens@med.usyd.edu.au)
  1. Centre for Values, Ethics and the Law in Medicine, University of Sydney, Australia

    Is “narrative” a story, a drama, or a life? Is it a general class of text? According to this collection, narrative can be any of these things—and more. This raises an interesting question. Why do researchers focus on “narrative” when the meaning of the term is so ambiguous and variously interpreted?


    Embedded Image

    Eds Brian Hurwitz, Trisha Greenhalgh, Vieda Skultans

    Blackwell and BMJ Books,£45, pp 456

    ISBN 0 7279 1792 7

    Rating: Embedded ImageEmbedded ImageEmbedded ImageEmbedded Image

    The main motivation of this type of research seems to be to counter the social fragmentation that goes with specialisation. Specialisation creates communication barriers between experts and non-experts and also between different tribes of experts. Narrative bridges the …

    View Full Text

    Sign in

    Log in through your institution

    Free trial

    Register for a free trial to thebmj.com to receive unlimited access to all content on thebmj.com for 14 days.
    Sign up for a free trial

    Subscribe