Editorials

Management of stroke in childhood

BMJ 2005; 330 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.330.7501.1161 (Published 19 May 2005) Cite this as: BMJ 2005;330:1161
  1. Lewis Rosenbloom, consultant paediatric neurologist (83waterloo@supanet.com)
  1. Alder Hey Children's Hospital, Liverpool L3 0BQ

    Guidelines are welcome, but have some gaps—such as perinatal stroke

    Stroke care for adults has been revolutionised in recent years, possibly in association with the publication of national clinical guidelines for stroke.1 In consequence, rehabilitative care after stroke for adults is now considered the norm. Stroke is less common in children, and clinical experience and anecdotal evidence indicate that children may receive a variable quality of care. A welcome development therefore has been the publication last year of guidelines by the UK Royal College of Physicians paediatric stroke working group.2

    The guidelines deal mainly with the diagnosis, investigation, and management of acute arterial ischaemic stroke in children beyond the neonatal period, covering acute presentation, management, rehabilitation, and longer term care. …

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