News 2005 UK election special

Avoiding the issues

BMJ 2005; 330 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.330.7498.986 (Published 28 April 2005) Cite this as: BMJ 2005;330:986
  1. David G Green Civitas: The Institute for the Study of Civil Society, director

    By not addressing the monopolistic nature of the NHS, all three parties fail to raise the real issues, saysDavid Green

    Comparing manifestos tells us as much about what the three main parties don't say as what they do. All three main parties agree that the NHS should continue to be a public sector monopoly. But the NHS is only one way to achieve the ideal shared across Europe: that no one should be denied health care because they lack money. A strong case can be made that the social insurance schemes of Germany, France, and Switzerland have been more successful than the NHS system. The poorest people in those countries enjoy a higher standard of care than in the United Kingdom, not having to face rationing and restricted choice.

    However, the differences in policy between the three parties are not trivial. …

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