Editorials

What makes a good clinical decision support system

BMJ 2005; 330 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.330.7494.740 (Published 31 March 2005) Cite this as: BMJ 2005;330:740
  1. Gretchen P Purcell, paediatric surgery fellow (gretchenpurcell@stanfordalumni.org)
  1. Division of Pediatric Surgery, Pittsburgh Children's Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA

    We have some answers, but implementing good decision support is still hard

    Clinical decision support is the provision of “clinical knowledge and patient-related information, intelligently filtered or presented at appropriate times, to enhance patient care.”1 Medical institutions are increasingly adopting tools that offer decision support to improve patient outcomes and reduce errors. Healthcare providers and administrators with little or no training in computer science may be asked to evaluate, select, or contribute to the development of decision support systems for their practices. Is there an easy way to determine which clinical decision support systems are good?

    In this issue Kawamoto and colleagues provide some evidence based guidance in a systematic analysis of the ability of decision support systems to improve practice in …

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