Letters

Managing osteoarthritis of the knee

BMJ 2005; 330 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.330.7492.672-b (Published 17 March 2005) Cite this as: BMJ 2005;330:672

Conclusions about use of NSAIDs are misleading

  1. Florence Tubach, assistant professor of epidemiology (florence.tubach@bch.ap-hop-paris.fr),
  2. P Ravaud, professor of epidemiology,
  3. B Giraudeau, ssistant professor of biostatistics
  1. INSERM U738; Groupe Hospitalier Bichat-Claude Bernard (Assistance Publique—Hôpitaux de Paris); Faculté Xavier Bichat (Université Paris 7), 46 rue Henri Huchard, 75018 Paris, France
  2. INSERM U738; Groupe Hospitalier Bichat-Claude Bernard (Assistance Publique—Hôpitaux de Paris); Faculté Xavier Bichat (Université Paris 7), 46 rue Henri Huchard, 75018 Paris, France
  3. INSERM CIC 202, Faculté de Médecine, 2 bis Bd Tonnellé, 37032 Tours, France

    EDITOR—The meta-analysis by Bjordal et al of randomised controlled trials assessing the efficacy of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in osteoarthritic knee pain is technically well done, but the authors' conclusions are misleading.1 They assert that the mean change in pain, as measured on a visual analogue scale, over placebo was 10.1 mm (95% confidence interval 7.4 to 12.8) and claim …

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