Research ethics committees deserve support

BMJ 2005; 330 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.330.7489.472 (Published 24 February 2005)
Cite this as: BMJ 2005;330:472

Get access to this article and all of bmj.com for the next 14 days

Sign up for a 14 day free trial today

Access to the full text of this article requires a subscription or payment. Please log in or subscribe below.

  1. John Alexander (jialexander@macunlimited.net), chair1
  1. 1 South West Multicentre Research Ethics Committee, Lescaze Offices, Dartington TQ9 6JE

    I agree with Wade that audit and certain kinds of research have similarities in purpose, structure, and ethics and that audit is not reviewed within the same strict ethical guidelines.1 However, this does not indicate that “research and audit cannot be distinguished.” The definitions and differences have been published.2 3 Audit and research surveys raise similar issues regarding validity, confidentiality, inconvenience, and the revelation of unacceptable practice, but the potential ethical problems are less than for, say, trials of medicines. Both audit and surveys merit a thorough but possibly truncated review.

    Who should decide?

    Wade says that the decision of an …

    Get access to this article and all of bmj.com for the next 14 days

    Sign up for a 14 day free trial today

    Access to the full text of this article requires a subscription or payment. Please log in or subscribe below.

    Article access

    Article access for 1 day

    Purchase this article for £20 $30 €32*

    The PDF version can be downloaded as your personal record

    * Prices do not include VAT

    THIS WEEK'S POLL