Letters

Issues in reporting epidemiological studies: Authors' reply

BMJ 2005; 330 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.330.7483.146-d (Published 13 January 2005) Cite this as: BMJ 2005;330:146
  1. Stuart J Pocock, professor ([email protected]),
  2. Timothy J Collier, lecturer,
  3. Kimberley J Dandreo, epidemiologist
  1. Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT
  2. Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT
  3. New England Research Institutes, 9 Galen Street, Watertown, MA 02472, USA

    EDITOR—We agree with Gillman that estimates and their confidence intervals contain the key information when reporting results. However, our observation that many epidemiological studies lack statistical power is still highly pertinent.

    The relevance of P values in epidemiologic publications will continue to be debated. Our view is that they are of value if used sparingly and interpreted wisely.

    We are surprised that Blackburn questions our premise that studies in clinical epidemiology in people …

    View Full Text

    Sign in

    Log in through your institution

    Free trial

    Register for a free trial to thebmj.com to receive unlimited access to all content on thebmj.com for 14 days.
    Sign up for a free trial

    Subscribe