Letters

Impact of congenital colour vision deficiency

BMJ 2005; 330 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.330.7482.96-c (Published 06 January 2005) Cite this as: BMJ 2005;330:96

Authors' reply

  1. Jugnoo S Rahi ([email protected]), clinical senior lecturer in ophthalmic epidemiology,
  2. Phillippa Cumberland, senior research fellow,
  3. Catherine S Peckham, professor of paediatric epidemiology
  1. Centre for Paediatric Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Institute of Child Health, London WC1N 1EH
  2. Centre for Paediatric Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Institute of Child Health, London WC1N 1EH

    EDITOR—We recognise that people with colour vision defects can experience difficulties in everyday life. These vary according to the nature and severity of the condition as well as the personal circumstances of the affected person and the ability to develop adaptive strategies, as illustrated by Wiegersma and Sellars and on bmj.com.1

    Several criteria have to be …

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