Reviews Personal views

My disappointment with an ethics committee

BMJ 2004; 329 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.329.7469.807 (Published 30 September 2004) Cite this as: BMJ 2004;329:807
  1. Siao Pei Tan, medical student (s0127110@sms.ed.ac.uk)
  1. Edinburgh University

    Four years ago my grandmother had a stroke. When my grandfather found out he took it very badly and had a major stroke himself. The doctors had to perform emergency surgery, but he could not give his consent because of his illness. It saved his life but left him severely disabled: unable to speak, bedridden, and paralysed for eight months before he died. Was the surgery a mistake? Knowing that the surgery carried such risk, would he have wanted it?

    When I was a fourth year medical student I got the opportunity to study a topic I am passionate about: the factors that affect someone's desire for active medical intervention. I intended to describe to the research participants a stroke scenario very similar to my grandfather's and ask them would they have wanted the surgery if they were a member of the victim's family or if they themselves had had the stroke. I would then relate the participants' characteristics, such as age, social support, perception of health status, and social and financial background, to their …

    View Full Text

    Sign in

    Log in through your institution

    Free trial

    Register for a free trial to thebmj.com to receive unlimited access to all content on thebmj.com for 14 days.
    Sign up for a free trial

    Subscribe