Reviews PERSONAL VIEW

What if the government refuses to ban smoking in public places?

BMJ 2004; 329 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.329.7468.749 (Published 23 September 2004) Cite this as: BMJ 2004;329:749
  1. Jammi N Rao, director of public health ([email protected])
  1. North Birmingham Primary Care Trust

    I came across a new TLA (that's “three letter acronym”) the other day: KDM. It stands for key decision maker. It was in a great big document that was in my post on how to go about persuading the great and the good to do something to reduce people's exposure to secondhand smoke in public places.


    Embedded Image

    In Ireland smokers are now left out in the cold

    Credit :FRAN VEALE/GETTY IMAGES

    According to this framework for action a large number of public health professionals should devote a great deal of energy to winning the hearts and minds of city councillors, business leaders, trade unions, company bosses, and community leaders to act to limit or ban smoking in public places and in places of work. These people and organisations are the KDMs that we should be influencing.

    That's all very well—but the thought occurred to me that there's one KDM that matters …

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