Minerva

Minerva

BMJ 2004; 329 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.329.7467.692 (Published 16 September 2004) Cite this as: BMJ 2004;329:692

Hearing becomes specialised very early on in life. Auditory regions in the left hemisphere of the brain generally dominate over the right when it comes to speech, and the right hemisphere regions tend to process music and tones. Scientists have now established that at least part of the difference in the brain arises from differences in the ears, and the hair cells in particular (Science 2004;305: 1581).

The World Association of Medical Editors has a policy on “geopolitical” intrusion. Editorial decisions should not, they say, be affected by the origins of the manuscript, including the nationality, ethnicity, political beliefs, race, or religion of the authors, and decisions to edit and publish should not be determined by the policies of governments or other agencies outside of the journal itself. There's a suspicion that at least one publisher is not adhering to this policy and WAME would like to hear from anyone else who believes that articles may be prevented from publication for such reasons (email Margaret_Winker@jama-archives.org).

The Epley manoeuvre is a complicated series of head movements designed to treat acute benign positional vertigo. A randomised clinical trial of the Epley manoeuvre performed on patients with benign positional vertigo presenting to an emergency department …

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