Reviews TV

Real Life: My Mum is My Dad

BMJ 2004; 329 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.329.7461.356-a (Published 05 August 2004) Cite this as: BMJ 2004;329:356
  1. Petra Boynton (p.boynton@pcps.ucl.ac.uk), non-clinical lecturer in international health services research
  1. University College London

    ITV 1, 1 August at 10 45 pm

    Rating: Embedded ImageEmbedded ImageEmbedded Image

    Transgender issues have suddenly become very popular. Nadia, the favourite to win this year's Big Brother reality television show, is transsexual. Sky television recently broadcast There's Something About Miriam, where men competed to win the affections of Miriam, a pre-op transwoman (male to female transsexual), not realising that she had a penis. And last Saturday the Guardian newspaper ran a four-page investigative piece on the efficacy of gender reassignment surgery, claiming “public acceptance of transsexuals has grown in recent years.”

    But a presence in the public eye doesn't necessarily equal acceptance, and transsexuals continue to face hostility, harassment, and abuse. The whole premise of There's Something About Miriam was not a celebration of transgendered life. It was designed to elicit horror from the winning contestant discovering that his dream date had a penis. …

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