Letters

Bone scanning in lung cancer: Authors' reply

BMJ 2004; 329 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.329.7459.231-a (Published 22 July 2004) Cite this as: BMJ 2004;329:231
  1. Martin Hetzel (martin.hetzel@medizin.uni-ulm.de), consultant physician,
  2. Coskun Arslandemir, physician,
  3. Holger Schirrmeister, consultant in nuclear medicine
  1. Department of Internal Medicine II, University of Ulm, D-89081 Ulm, Germany
  2. Department of Internal Medicine II, University of Ulm, D-89081 Ulm, Germany
  3. Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Ulm

    EDITOR—Benamore et al assume that our incidence of bone metastases was high because of the unusually high proportion of patients with small cell lung cancer. The incidence of distant metastases is 30-50% at initial presentation of non-small cell lung cancer.1 The incidence of bone metastases was highest in the small cell variety at initial presentation but was identical at necropsy in the four main types.2 Many bone metastases are therefore likely to be missed at initial diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer. …

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