Extending CONSORT to include cluster trials

BMJ 2004; 328 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.328.7441.654 (Published 18 March 2004)
Cite this as: BMJ 2004;328:654

Get access to this article and all of bmj.com for the next 14 days

Sign up for a 14 day free trial today

Access to the full text of this article requires a subscription or payment. Please log in or subscribe below.

  1. Michael J Campbell, professor of medical statistics (m.j.campbell@sheffield.ac.uk)
  1. Institute of General Practice, School of Health and Related Research, University of Sheffield

    Welcome extension will help to understand trials better and reduce bias

    Anyone who has tried to appraise a randomised controlled trial critically will be aware of the frustration that arises when a key piece of information is missing. To understand the results of a randomised controlled trial a reader must understand its design, conduct, analysis, and interpretation. That goal can be achieved only through complete transparency from authors. The original and revised CONSORT (consolidated standards of reporting trials) statements were designed to help authors improve reporting by using a checklist and flow diagram and have been well cited.1 These have now been extended to include cluster trials (p 702).2 Cluster trials randomise interventions to groups of patients rather than to individual patients and have their own problems. Using the extended CONSORT statement should help reduce bias and help readers to understand a cluster trial's conduct and to assess thevalidity of its …

    Get access to this article and all of bmj.com for the next 14 days

    Sign up for a 14 day free trial today

    Access to the full text of this article requires a subscription or payment. Please log in or subscribe below.

    Article access

    Article access for 1 day

    Purchase this article for £20 $30 €32*

    The PDF version can be downloaded as your personal record

    * Prices do not include VAT

    THIS WEEK'S POLL