Editorials

Preserving today's scientific record for tomorrow

BMJ 2004; 328 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.328.7431.61 (Published 09 January 2004) Cite this as: BMJ 2004;328:61
  1. Victoria Reich, director (vreich@stanford.edu),
  2. David Rosenthal, chief scientist (dshr@stanford.edu)
  1. LOCKSS Program, 1454 Page Mill Road, Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA

    LOCKSS marries age old concepts of librarianship with modern technology

    Let us save what remains: not by vaults and locks which fence them from the public eye and use in consigning them to the waste of time, but by such a multiplication of copies, as shall place them beyond the reach of accident.

    Thomas Jefferson1

    Information stored on paper can survive for millennia; information stored digitally today may not be recoverable this time next week. With seven million pages of new information added to the world wide web each day, the volatility of websites has emerged as an urgent problem, especially as websites are becoming the version of record for scientific journals. Three studies of links in peer reviewed journals all found their useful life to be a few …

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