Reviews TV

What the Industrial Revolution Did for Us: Modern Medicine

BMJ 2003; 327 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.327.7422.1056 (Published 30 October 2003) Cite this as: BMJ 2003;327:1056
  1. Trevor Jackson, assistant editor (tjackson@bmj.com)
  1. BMJ

    BBC 2, 28 October at 8 pm

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    Presenter Dan Cruickshank has an infectious, donnish enthusiasm and joie de vivre that television producers obviously believe lends popular appeal to subjects that some viewers might otherwise consider dry as dust. In the latest episode of What the Industrial Revolution Did for Us, Cruickshank brought his straightforward storytelling and capacity for wonder to bear on the earliest controlled medical trials and the birth of modern medicine.

    Introducing us to the achievements and discoveries of the likes of vaccine pioneer Edward Jenner, James Lind, who discovered the cause of scurvy, and William Withering, who is credited with introducing digitalis to medical science, Cruickshank …

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