Bmj Usa: Letter

RAPID RESPONSES FROM BMJ.COM: Best practice is best in general practice

BMJ 2003; 327 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjusa.02010004 (Published 19 November 2003) Cite this as: BMJ 2003;327:E84
  1. Paul McDonald (p.mcdonald@worc.ac.uk), senior lecturer (research)
  1. University College, Worcester, UK
  2. Port Adelaide Community Health Service, South Australia 5015, Australia
  3. Wellington Hospital, New Zealand
  4. Division of Primary Health Care, University of Bristol Cotham House, Cotham Hill Bristol BS6 6JL, UK
  5. Winchester, Hampshire, SO22 5EF, UK
  6. Edgecumbe Consulting Ltd, Bristol BS8 3ES, UK
  7. Department of Bio-engineering, Bagrit Centre, Imperial College, London SW7 2BX, UK

    This article originally appeared in BMJ USA

    Editor—I commend Freeman and Sweeney on a fascinating piece of work. Firstly, their modern use of Balint's techniques worked well and has produced some fascinating insights into the use of best practice by GPs. Secondly, it is clear that GPs are tailoring best evidence to the needs and circumstances of individual patients—this is exactly what is intended!

    Hoorah for GPs for not being terrorized by the evidence mafia! Hoorah for their sensible, reasoned responses to the emperor's new clothes.

    “Old habits”

    1. Peter Lake (plake@health.on.net), senior medical officer
    1. University College, Worcester, UK
    2. Port Adelaide Community Health Service, South Australia 5015, Australia
    3. Wellington Hospital, New Zealand
    4. Division of Primary Health Care, University of Bristol Cotham House, Cotham Hill Bristol BS6 6JL, UK
    5. Winchester, Hampshire, SO22 5EF, UK
    6. Edgecumbe Consulting Ltd, Bristol BS8 3ES, UK
    7. Department of Bio-engineering, Bagrit Centre, Imperial College, London SW7 2BX, UK

      Editor—“Old habits die hard!”—surely the most obvious explanation for …

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