Bmj Usa: Letter

RAPID RESPONSES FROM BMJ.COM

BMJ 2003; 327 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjusa.01050004 (Published 19 November 2003) Cite this as: BMJ 2003;327:E34

This article originally appeared in BMJ USA

As of April 13th, three e-letters had been posted on bmj.com in response to the paper by Delaney. They are reproduced below in abbreviated form.—Editor

What about dysphagia as an “alarm symptom”?

  1. Ross Upshur, assistant professor (rupshur@idirect.com)
  1. Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Canada
  2. Mackay Hospital, Queensland 4740, Australia
  3. Cambridge Upper Gastro-Intestinal Unit, Addenbrookes NHS Trust, United Kingdom
  4. BMJ USA

    Editor—I think the “10-minute consultation” series is an excellent addition to the BMJ. Why was dysphagia not included in the list of “alarm symptoms”?

    Don't forget about lactose intolerance

    1. Ric Reiner, gastroenterologist (rereiner@ozemail.com.au)
    1. Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Canada
    2. Mackay Hospital, Queensland 4740, Australia
    3. Cambridge Upper Gastro-Intestinal Unit, Addenbrookes NHS Trust, United Kingdom
    4. BMJ USA

      Editor—Lactose intolerance is one of the most common etiologies within all communities. In a selected population presenting with gastrointestinal problems or to gastroenterologists for endoscopy/consultation, about two in five patients will have coexistent lactose intolerance.

      Biopsies taken for small bowel histology and enzymes/disacharridases in all patients with non-ulcer dyspepsia will identify concomitant lactose intolerance …

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