RAPID RESPONSES FROM BMJ.COM

BMJ 2003; 327 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjusa.01050005 (Published 18 November 2003)
Cite this as: BMJ 2003;327:E33

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This article originally appeared in BMJ USA

Two e-letters posted on bmj.com in response to the paper by Mimouni et al are reproduced below (after editing). Web links to some of Raphael's artwork referenced below are available in the original rapid responses at www.bmj.com/cgi/eletters/321/7276/1622—Editor

More examples of polydactyly in Raphael's paintings

  1. Alfio Cantini, director (cantini@supereva.it)
  1. Department of Neurology, City Hospital, Prato, Italy
  2. Servicio de PediatrÍa, Hospital de Cabuenes, GijÓn, Spain

    This article originally appeared in BMJ USA

    Editor—The first work of Raphael known to us is a fresco representing the “Virgin with child” (Urbino, Italy, Raphael House). The right foot of the child unmistakably has six toes. I came across this detail about two years ago when viewing a poster of the painting in a waiting room in my hospital. The poster is still there, and I can't help looking at the child's digits whenever I step into the room. I had never thought, however, that it was anything …

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