Bmj Usa: Letter

Images of war: the other side

BMJ 2003; 327 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjusa.03060004 (Published 19 November 2003) Cite this as: BMJ 2003;327:E233
  1. Syed M H Rizvi ([email protected])
  1. St. Mary's Hospital, London, UK.
  2. Packard Children's Hospital, Palo Alto, California.
  3. The Aga Khan University, Karachi, Pakistan.

    Following are edited excerpts from the Rapid Responses generated by this article, which can be read in their entirety at http://bmj.com/cgi/eletters/326/7393/774

    From BMJ USA 2003;June:336

    Editor—Singh and DePellegrin take a very one-sided view. Physicians have the freedom to do what is best for patients in many circumstances, as when the patient is non compos mentis. I cite the example of the young boy, who has recently been the center of much sympathy, who lost his limbs and much of his family. Many organizations are now arranging aid for his treatment. Would it have been possible if the horrible images of his injured body had not been portrayed? The same gory images that are repelling to show become an instrument of drawing sympathy for someone who needs it.

    If it were not for the public awareness …

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