Bmj Usa: Minerva

Minerva

BMJ 2003; 327 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjusa.03050005 (Published 19 November 2003) Cite this as: BMJ 2003;327:E225

From BMJ USA 2003;May:290

Humans are still way ahead of sharks in the competition to be top predator. Last year, while thousands of sharks were eaten by people, only 60 people were bitten by sharks, 20% fewer than the previous year. The international file on shark attacks, compiled in Florida, reported only three deaths worldwide (www.flmnh.ufl.edu/fish/sharks/statistics/2002attacksummary.htm). Sharks have always preferred surfers to other water users (56% of attacks), but the odds against injury are still stacked in the surfers' favor.

Sir Isaac Newton, one of Britain's greatest scientists, was no stranger to spin. An essay in Science (2003;299:831–832) says he manipulated his public image by releasing different portraits to different audiences. To some he appeared as a country gentleman, to others a visionary Roman swathed in fine robes (his favorite). The solitary troubled genius painted by Godfrey Kneller, now his most famous image, wasn't seen in public until after his death.

Recent studies show that ibuprofen interferes with the effect of aspirin on platelet aggregation. Ibuprofen may limit related benefits in people, according to a Scottish cohort study (Lancet 2003;361:573–574). People with cardiovascular disease who were …

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