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Death becomes us

BMJ 2003; 327 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.327.7408.231 (Published 24 July 2003) Cite this as: BMJ 2003;327:231
  1. Jocalyn Clark, editorial registrar (jclark@bmj.com)
  1. BMJ

    According to www.deathclock.com I will die on Tuesday 14 March 2051. At the time of writing that translates to 1 504 875 429 seconds left of living. But when my time comes will I die the death I want?

    Perhaps the best way to die is to do so in a way that leaves the possibility of living again. Arrangements can be made at the Alcor Life Preservation Foundation (www.alcor.org) to cryopreserve your body—that is, to freeze it in liquid nitrogen for future resurrection. Once medical technology catches up, proponents of cryonics claim, it may be possible to have your suspended body revived, the cause of your death cured, and your aged and damaged cells repaired. Cryonics is touted as an extended form of artificial resuscitation: you wouldn't deny a paramedic resuscitating your heart after it stops beating, would you?

    For those curious about death and the funeral industry, www.msprozac.zoovy.com (which is run by a webmaster battling advanced …

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