Letters

Health professionals' beliefs may undermine effective pain relief for dying patients

BMJ 2003; 327 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.327.7408.222-a (Published 24 July 2003) Cite this as: BMJ 2003;327:222
  1. Marina Cuttini, epidemiologist (marina.cuttini@arsanita.toscana.it),
  2. Veronica Casotto, statistician,
  3. Rodolfo Saracci, epidemiologist,
  4. Marcello Orzalesi, neonatologist
  1. Unit of Epidemiology, Burlo Garofolo Maternal and Child Health Institute, Trieste and Regional Agency, 34100 Trieste, Italy
  2. Regional Agency for Health of Tuscany, Florence, Italy
  3. Division of Epidemiology, IFC, National Research Council, Pisa, Italy For the EURONIC Study Group
  4. Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Bambin Gesù Children's Hospital, Rome, Italy

    EDITOR—Murray et al include pain relief for dying people among the essential health interventions that should be accessible for all, in developing countries.1 Even developed countries, however, have different pain relief policies.


    Embedded Image

    In Tlingit culture, Land-Otter-Man rescues the souls of drowning people and turns them into land otters

    Credit: MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN/HEYE FOUNDATION/WERNER FORMAN ARCHIVE

    In Italy, where medicinal morphine consumption for 2000 ranked among the lowest in Europe,2 a …

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