Severe acute respiratory syndrome: Numbers do not tell whole story

BMJ 2003; 326 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.326.7403.1395 (Published 19 June 2003)
Cite this as: BMJ 2003;326:1395

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  1. Ying-Hen Hsieh, professor (hsieh@amath.nchu.edu.tw),
  2. Cathy Woan-Shu Chen, professor
  1. Department of Applied Mathematics, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan
  2. Graduate Institute of Statistics and Actuarial Science, Feng Chia University, Taichung 407

    EDITOR—Parry mentioned the recent rapid increase in the numbers of cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in Taiwan, making it the third worst affected area in the world, and asks whether the disease is under control.1 2

    The daily numbers of new cases of SARS in Taiwan up to 2 June have declined since mid-May (figure (top)). However, the delay caused by the incubation time as well as the time lag for diagnosis …

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