Minerva

Minerva

BMJ 2003; 326 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.326.7399.1154 (Published 22 May 2003) Cite this as: BMJ 2003;326:1154

Culinary and medicinal herbs provide important sources of dietary antioxidants. But according to a study in the Journal of Nutrition (2003;133: 1286) there's a 1000-fold difference among antioxidant concentrations of various herbs. Of the dried herbs and spices tested, oregano, sage, thyme, lemon balm, clove, allspice, and cinnamon came out on top and may be an even better source of dietary antioxidants than many other foods such as fruit, cereals, and vegetables.


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The facial and dental consequences of prolonged finger sucking are well known, but deformity of the sucked finger is much less common. A 15 year old girl had sucked her right index finger every night since birth. This had resulted in a 90° anticlockwise rotational deformity. As an infant she had been nursed on her front and this may have been why her finger, rather than her thumb, had been sucked. The deformity was corrected with an osteotomy and K wiring.

Mark Howard Wilson, clinical fellow, Helena Van Dam, clinical fellow, Charles Nduka, specialist registrar, Mohammed Shibu, consultant, department of plastic surgery, Royal London Hospital, London E1 1BB

Obesity and diabetes may all be in the head. Homing in on the part of the brain that affects food intake, Italian scientists discovered that hypothalamic …

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