Editorials

Fifth international congress on peer review and biomedical publication

BMJ 2003; 326 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.326.7389.563 (Published 15 March 2003) Cite this as: BMJ 2003;326:563

Call for research

  1. Drummond Rennie, deputy editor JAMA,
  2. Annette Flanagin, managing senior editor JAMA,
  3. Richard Smith, editor,
  4. Jane Smith, deputy editor
  1. 515 N State St, Chicago IL 60610, USA
  2. BMJ
  3. BMJ, BMA House, Tavistock Square, London WC1H 9JR

    We have now held four peer review congresses at four year intervals, and their success is shown by the stimulus they have given to an evolving science—investigation of the process whereby scientific work is selected and published.14 Since the announcement of the first peer review congress in 1986, the numbers of abstracts submitted to successive congresses have increased from 50 to 110, 160, and 180, respectively. We have noted similar increases in the number of Medline citations on peer review, which since 2000 have averaged 170-200 per year.5

    We now …

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