Book Book

Forensic Medicine: Clinical and Pathological Aspects

BMJ 2003; 326 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.326.7388.556 (Published 08 March 2003) Cite this as: BMJ 2003;326:556
  1. Alex Vass, assistant editor (avass@bmj.com)
  1. Best Treatments, London

    Eds Jason Payne-James, Anthony Busuttil, William Smock

    Greenwich Medical Media, £135, pp 840

    ISBN 1 841100 269


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    Forensic medicine has humble and ancient origins. What are thought to be some of the first descriptions of how to examine injuries were found carved on pieces of bamboo dating back to the Qin dynasty in China, from about 220 BC. The first publication on forensic medicine in the United Kingdom was by William Hunter in the 18th century. His essays were on the injuries found on murdered bastard children. From these dark beginnings forensic medicine has developed into a large specialty with several subspecialties.

    Forensic medicine must be one of the most unusual, and certainly one of the most macabre, branches of medicine. This …

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