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A tabloid story

BMJ 2003; 326 doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.326.7382.231 (Published 25 January 2003) Cite this as: BMJ 2003;326:231
  1. Geoffrey Hulman ([email protected]), consultant histopathologist
  1. Nottingham City Hospital

    It was a scandal of national magnitude, or so the tabloids thought. And because that is what they thought, it did become a scandal of national magnitude.

    I feel devalued by those who think there is no smoke without fire

    The story broke in June 2000 at the height of the doctor bashing frenzy. Accusations about disposal of organs and body parts were made against me and a video had been released to the News of the World. Both the chief executive and I knew that the whole thing was nonsense. The story was a desperate attempt by mortuary workers to discredit the trust as the result of a longstanding grievance. Despite this, the chief executive suspended me. He had no choice. The health secretary had ordered my suspension, an independent inquiry, and protection of the mortuary workers as whistleblowers.

    My wife and I tried to explain to our children why I would not be going to work for a while. They listened in silent disbelief. I phoned my mother and close relatives …

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