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Genes and ethics

BMJ 2002; 325 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.325.7368.0/i (Published 12 October 2002) Cite this as: BMJ 2002;325:i

Genes and ethics always feature prominently in any thinking about the future of health care. The genetic revolution has the potential to transform medicine from an enterprise concerned mostly with end stage disease to one that more often predicts and prevents. The revolution also presents new ethical problems. The topics of genes and ethics will become ever commoner in medical journals, and this issue of the BMJ is a step along that way.

Two Britons and an American have this week won Nobel prizes for their work on genes (p 791). Sydney Brenner from Cambridge used a nematode model to …

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