Press Press

Both sides now

BMJ 2002; 325 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.325.7364.603/a (Published 14 September 2002) Cite this as: BMJ 2002;325:603
  1. Trevor Jackson, assistant editor (tjackson@bmj.com)
  1. BMJ

    In the quest for balanced reporting on issues such as MMR, journalists may be misleading the public

    There has long been a tendency to blame the mass media, particularly tabloid newspapers, for public attitudes to and understanding of matters of scientific controversy, such as the MMR (measles, mumps, and rubella) vaccine. But how far do newspapers, and television and radio news, affect what people believe and know?

    Researchers at the Cardiff School of Journalism, Media and Cultural Studies have been asking more than a thousand people what they think and know about MMR, human and animal …

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